Inframammary Fold Breast Augmentation Technique

Posted By on Aug 29, 2017 in Breast Augmentation, Breast Implants | 0 comments


The inframammary fold breast augmentation technique places an incision within the “new” breast crease so the scar blends well into the background. About 50 percent of the breast implant surgeries is performed through this method due to its “simplicity” and direct access to soft tissue layers of the chest.

 

Hence, the risk of asymmetry is perceived to be lower when the inframammary fold breast augmentation is used compared with other techniques.

 

In spite of the many advantages of this technique it has one major caveat: the visibility of scar.

 

inframammary fold breast augmentation

The use of Keller Funnel allows Dr. Smiley to shorten the incision, leading to more hidden scar within the breast crease.

Nonetheless, leading Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Tarick Smiley says certain steps can prevent or at least minimize risk of visible scar, with patient selection being the most important variable.

 

In Dr. Smiley’s recent videos on Snapchat, he demonstrated a patient he deemed to be a suitable candidate for the incision technique: She had mildly droopy breasts, which resulted in deep folds that could make it easier to hide the scar compared to someone without a prominent crease.

 

Dr. Smiley says breast implants can give the patient “more symmetry and fullness,” particularly when the implants would “reflect” her anatomy and cosmetic goals.

 

The patient received silicone breast implants known to provide softer results and more natural contour than saline implants.

 

Silicone implants are filled with silicone gel, while saline implants contain salt water solution and thus they have a strong predisposition to appear globular and firm once inside their pocket. This is particularly true for patients who are thin or small breasted, meaning they have little soft tissue coverage.

 

Proper marking prior to the placement of incision and pocket creation is the first step to ensure a well-hidden scar. Dr. Smiley marked the pre-existing inframammary fold and placed a short incision (not longer than 3 cm) slightly above the line.

 

The incision and its resulting scar are expected to remain on the underside bulge of the breast. (Note: In the first two months of recovery, the implants typically ride higher leading to excessive upper pole fullness; however, this rather unnatural appearance almost always corrects itself as the prostheses settle to their more natural location.)

 

Aside from proper patient selection, the risk of visible scar was further reduced with the use of Keller Funnel, a device that resembles an icing bag that propels the implant into its pocket with just a few successive squeezes. Not only it reduces the scar length, the amount of trauma around the wound edges is minimized as well, further promoting the best scar possible.

 

Because the patient’s pre-existing right breast was smaller than the other side, Dr. Smiley used a slightly bigger implant size to improve their symmetry.

 

And lastly, he closed the incisions in several rows, ensuring that the deeper layers received most of the tension while the skin was spared from “excessive pull,” thus further promoting the most hidden scar.

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