Upper Pole Fullness After Breast Augmentation

Posted By on Jun 23, 2017 in Breast Augmentation, Breast Implants, Breast Lift | 0 comments


Upper pole fullness after breast augmentation can be achieved with precise physical examination of the breasts. The idea is to identify the “challenges” and anatomical variables that must be overcome to achieve the best shape and projection possible.

 

Of course, the patient must be able to describe in details her cosmetic goals and expectations. Hence, patient-doctor communication plays a crucial role in the satisfaction rate, as suggested by leading Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Tarick Smiley.

 

Dr. Smiley has recently posted a series of Snapchat videos showing one patient whose primary goal was to achieve increased upper pole fullness after breast augmentation.

 

upper pole fullness after breast augmentation

While the patient’s pre-operative breasts had adequate soft tissue, they were remarkably pendulous that her areola sagged a few centimeters from its breast fold (or submammary crease). Further aggravating the sagging appearance was the deflated or “empty” upper breast pole.

 

Due to the extent of her breast sag, Dr. Smiley performed the standard breast lift technique in which an incision goes around the areola’s perimeter, down the midline, and then across the breast fold. The resulting scar from this method resembles an anchor, and so it is also aptly named as anchor lift.

 

before and after photos

before and after photos

Despite the growing popularity of modified breast lift techniques, the patient remained suited for the standard incision pattern because her areola required more than 5 cm of elevation, something that cannot be achieved with shorter incisions.

 

The anchor lift has allowed Dr. Smiley to remove some tissue and skin at the bottom of the breasts before lifting and reshaping the remaining tissue with the use of internal sutures. But as a stand-alone procedure, breast lift cannot give ample fullness on the upper poles of the breast—this is where implants become helpful.

 

Because the patient was more concerned about the final breast shape and fullness of the upper pole, a smaller or conservative-sized implant would suit her.

 

While showing the patient’s before and after photos, Dr. Smiley said “there is no significant change in her breast volume even with the use of implants, although the upper pole has received significant improvement in terms of looking full and youthful.”

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