Mastopexy for Tuberous Breasts

Posted By on Oct 13, 2016 in Breast Implants, Breast Lift, Reconstructive Plastic Surgery


Mastopexy for tuberous breasts is designed to correct the herniated appearance of the nipple area. Oftentimes, it also incorporate the use of breast implants to further improve the overall projection and shape, as suggested by leading Los Angeles plastic surgeon Dr. Tarick Smiley.

 

Mastopexy, or breast lift in layman’s term, is typically performed to reshape the sagging breasts. However, women with tuberous breast deformity can also benefit from this procedure.

 

mastopexy for tuberous breasts

While the exact origin of tuberous breasts remains unclear, its physical manifestations have been widely studied: They are caused by constriction of the connective tissue around and behind the areola, and the weak and thin tissue support that leads to the puffiness and herniation of the nipple area.

 

Aside from areola puffiness, mastopexy for tuberous breasts also deals with asymmetry in variable degrees (i.e., some are very mild while others are highly obvious) due to differences in shape, nipple size, breast volume, and projection.

 

Other physical manifestations of tuberous breasts include little soft tissue, enlarged or wide areola complex, and drooping appearance.

 

Mastopexy for tuberous breasts not just corrects the drooping appearance. Oftentimes, the surgeon must also remove some tissue behind the areola complex to reduce its puffiness. This is achieved by creating incisions around the areola’s edges, which typically fade into imperceptible scars.

 

The round incisions along the areola’s edges can also allow the surgeon to reduce its size.

 

While the tuberous breasts could be improved with mastopexy alone (without breast implants), it is important to note that it has its own limits.

 

With a simultaneous breast implant surgery, the surgeon is able to reduce the wide spacing between the breasts and improve their overall shape and volume.

 

During mastopexy for tuberous breasts that includes implants, it becomes more important than ever to release the constricting bands of connective tissue. The goal is to allow the prosthetics to settle centrally behind the areola complex, leading to a natural-looking shape.

 

Mastopexy for tuberous breasts is technically more demanding than a breast lift involving an “average” patient (no significant deformity; only soft tissue laxity due to aging or pregnancy). For this reason, one should be extra strict when choosing a surgeon.

 

Aside from having appropriate board certifications, the “right” surgeon should also be performing mastopexy, breast augmentation, reduction, and reconstructive breast surgeries on a regular basis. Ideally, he must be able to present hundreds if not thousands of before-and-after photos of his actual patients, which can serve as a proof that he has extensive experience.

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