Breast Lift for Large Sagging Breasts

Posted By on Apr 6, 2017 in Breast Lift, Breast Reduction | 0 comments


Breast lift for large sagging breasts faces unique challenges, which must be recognized and assessed well in advance of the surgery to achieve impressive results, as suggested by leading Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Tarick Smiley.

 

One major caveat of breast lift for large sagging breast is the susceptibility to drooping recurrence because of the sheer weight of the breasts. Nonetheless, this perceived challenge could be offset by several techniques, which have been explained below by Dr. Smiley:

 

breast lift for large sagging breasts

  • Achieve one’s optimal health

 

Dr. Smiley only performs breast lift on patients who are near their ideal weight, which they are able to maintain for at least of six months. Not only it ensures more precise tissue resection and thus more predictable long-term results, women of normal weight are also less likely to experience healing problems, infection, and unacceptable scarring compared to obese patients.

 

Obesity—along with diabetes, blood disorder, and other serious medical conditions—is closely linked to increased risk of complications after any type of surgery.

 

  • Simultaneous breast reduction

 

If the saggy breasts are hugely disproportionate in relation to the patient’s [thinner] frame, she may ask for a simultaneous breast reduction, which not just improves “body proportions” but also makes the breast less susceptible to the effects of gravity and aging.

 

It is important to note that breast reduction and breast lift share the same incision sites; hence, additional scarring is not an issue.

 

  • Anchor breast lift

 

Modified breast lift techniques—i.e., they result in fewer scars and possibly shorter recovery—give patients more options. Nonetheless, women with large sagging breasts can achieve no or very little improvement from them.

 

The anchor breast lift remains the best option for women with large sagging breasts; this is particularly true for someone needing a simultaneous breast reduction.

 

During an anchor breast lift, doctors create keyhole-shaped incision above the nipple area and then an anchor incision pattern that goes from the right to the left side of the lower breast pole. The goal is to remove some of the excess skin and elevate the breast tissue with the use of internal sutures.

 

The resulting scars go around the areola’s perimeter (perfectly blends at the dark-light skin junction), vertically between the areola and the submammary fold, and parallel to the fold.

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