Eliminating Breast Reduction Risk Factors

Posted By on Sep 22, 2017 in Breast Reduction, Plastic Surgery Risks | 0 comments


In body contouring plastic surgery, breast reduction has one of the highest patient satisfaction rates, as suggested by medical literature. This is not surprising since it can provide immediate relief from painful bra strap grooves, back pain, nerve and disc damage, postural problems, and other symptoms caused by being too “endowed.”

 

Leading Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Tarick Smiley, who performs breast reduction on a regular basis, says that most complications are minor or “just nuisances,” as opposed to health-threatening problems.

 

The standard breast reduction incision technique favors women who require large downsizing, i.e., more than 600 gram of tissue per side.

Nonetheless, Dr. Smiley says he requires all his patients to pass lab screening to determine that they are fit for the surgery and its ensuing recovery. A careful preoperative evaluation, he adds, also allows him to identify breast reduction risk factors, many of which can be eliminated or at least controlled to minimize risk of complications.

 

A 2013 study, which involved more than 500 women who had bilateral breast reduction, has shown that infection at the surgical site (16 percent) and delayed wound healing (10) were the most common complications.

 

The study, along with other previous findings, was able to identify the risk factors or predictors of complications following breast reduction surgery.

 

  • Smoking

 

Smokers were twice more likely to experience infection and poor wound healing than non-smokers because of the nicotine’s constricting effect on blood vessels, preventing the efficient delivery of nutrient- and oxygen-rich blood to the wound.

 

However, complete smoking cessation for a minimum of two weeks prior to surgery and throughout the recovery is enough to reverse most of the detrimental effects of tobacco use.

 

  • Diabetes

 

Diabetic patients have compromised healing and so they face a higher risk of necrosis (death of tissue) of the areola. Hence, prior to surgery it is highly ideal to eliminate or at least control serious medical conditions through medications and/or lifestyle changes.

 

  • Large reduction

 

The risk of poor wound healing and infection is markedly different between a patient having a 500-gram reduction and someone requiring a 1,000-gram excision.

 

Large breast reduction entails more breast tissue and skin removal, which could lead to increased bleeding and higher risk of comprising the blood supply. Furthermore, a significant downsize could make it extra challenging to achieve a natural breast shape.

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