Liposuction and Keloids Risk

Posted By on Aug 3, 2017 in Liposuction, Plastic Surgery Risks | 0 comments


The vast majority of liposuction patients will have their scars heal and fade well into the background. This has become possible with the use of microcannula, a straw-like device whose outside diameter is generally defined as 2.2 mm or smaller.

 

Aside from microcannula and the use of meticulous surgical techniques, leading Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Tarick Smiley says “how well a scar fades” will also depend on patient commitment. For instance, sun exposure is best avoided for about a year to prevent the scar from turning dark and thus becoming more visible.

 

liposuction and keloids

Photo Credit: Medscape

Furthermore, prudent patients should not apply any topical treatments (e.g., scar creams and gels) without first consulting their surgeons and avoid submerging their incisions in water (pools and bathtubs) until these are fully sealed, which happens around three weeks.

 

Nonetheless, liposuction and keloids risk remains an issue among patients with a history of aggressive scarring.

 

While having a history of keloids is not a contraindication to liposuction, prudent patients should disclose their susceptibility to aggressive scarring to their doctors who can explain the risks and the possible need for aggressive and proactive scar treatments and preventions.

 

Keloid is a tough scar that grows beyond the injury site (or liposuction incision). It usually appears pink or purple and has an irregular shape that tends to expand progressively.

 

To prevent visible scars, Dr. Smiley says all efforts are made to position the liposuction incisions within the natural skin fold and beneath the “bikini area.” To further allay the concerns of patients, he says that only certain parts of the body are prone to keloid scarring such as the earlobes, chest, and upper outer arms—places that are generally avoided during the creation of small puncture wounds used in liposuction.

 

While follow-up consultation is important for all patients after liposuction, this is particularly true of individuals with a previous history of keloids who require closer monitoring so their surgeons can aggressively treat scars that are becoming thick and unsightly.

 

The use of cortisone injections is arguably the most common treatment for keloids. However, they are only performed a few weeks apart to prevent skin changes such as depression and hypopigmentation (lightening of color).

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