How to Minimize Buttock Lift Risks

Posted By on Apr 7, 2017 in Body Lift, Plastic Surgery Risks | 0 comments


Butt lift surgery (should not to be confused with Brazilian butt lift, which in essence is buttock augmentation via fat transfer) is typically performed in massive weight loss patients who often complain about the redundant skin.

 

Most buttock lift risks can be avoided or at least reduced with proper patient selection. The goal is to reserve this elective surgery only to people who have achieved their optimal health and weight.

 

Lab screening and lengthy consultation between the surgeon and his patient will help determine if the latter is healthy enough to handle surgery, according to the California Surgical Institute website.

 

Patient cooperation is another key factor to minimize butt lift risks. For instance, infection, increased bleeding, and poor healing are closely linked to smoking, aspirin and other drugs and supplements with blood thinning properties, and obesity—risk factors that can be eliminated by the patients’ themselves.

 

buttock lift risks

 

A good rule of thumb is to discontinue smoking and aspirin products at least three weeks before and after surgery.

 

Wound healing problem is one of the main issues during recovery. It is important to note that the incisions—whether made within the junction of the butt cheek and posterior thigh, or near the waistline if the surgery is combined with a lower body lift—are under a great deal of stress due to movement while walking, sitting, etc.

 

To reduce risk of wound healing problems, great surgeons know the importance of proper suturing techniques in which there is no or very little tension on the skin. For this reason, layers of sutures in which the deep tissue receives most of the tension are critical to promote good healing and scarring.

 

Nonetheless, patients should also do their part in reducing healing problems by avoiding over-exertion for a minimum of three weeks postop. For this reason, individuals whose work requires heavy lifting or any type of rigorous activity are advised to take a longer time off than people with desk job.

 

Unacceptable scarring (i.e., keloids or thick scars) is another risk, although this can be avoided with meticulous wound closure, wound care, and proactive scar treatments like silicone tapes and gel and sunscreen. Nonetheless, genetics remains one of the strongest predictors of how well a person will scar.

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