How to Prevent Rhinoplasty Infection

Posted By on May 19, 2017 in Plastic Surgery Risks, Rhinoplasty | 0 comments


Preventing or at least minimizing the risk of rhinoplasty infection should be one of the most important goals of any prudent surgeon performing nose-reshaping surgery, according to California Surgical Institute website.

 

The list below shows the basic guidelines on how to minimize risk of rhinoplasty infection.

 

  • Strict patient selection

rhinoplasty infection

Anyone with uncontrolled medical condition linked to higher risk of infection and poor healing is discouraged to undergo any elective plastic surgery.

 

Prior to rhinoplasty, judicious surgeons require all their patients to pass lab screening to ensure that they can handle the surgery and the ensuing recovery.

 

  • Achieve one’s optimal health

 

Achieving one’s optimal health generally includes eating healthy, avoiding smoking and too much alcohol and caffeine, and discontinuing aspirin and aspirin-like products for at least 2-3 weeks.

 

  • Accredited surgical facility or hospital

 

This is the safest surgical venue. Being accredited means the surgical facility adheres to the highest patient safety standard.

 

Moreover, an accredited surgical facility has the necessary equipment, building design that promotes sterilized environment, and highly trained staff to reduce risk of infection and contamination.

 

  • Antibiotics

 

Many surgeons today recommend prophylactic (preventive) antibiotics to help ward off infection, which must be taken on time and their full course completed.

 

  • Patient education

 

The patient must be informed of the telltale signs of infection such as elevated temperature, unusual skin changes, and poor healing.

 

If the patient notices anything unusual, he must notify his surgeon right away than wait for his next scheduled appointment. Some individuals might be apprehensive contacting their surgeon thinking that they might bother them over some trivial thing.

 

Furthermore, the patient must understand that his full commitment is necessary to minimize risk of complications. For instance, smoking even just a single stick a few weeks leading up to the surgery or during the initial healing stage is enough to drastically increase one’s risk of poor healing, infection, and less than optimal results.

 

  • Leave the nose alone

 

It is important to leave the nose alone to heal. No picking at the incisions, blowing hard, wearing eyeglasses, or anything that might compromise healing.

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